Lady Macbeth: Newcomer Florence Pugh is a Tour-De-Force in Taut Domestic Thriller

I almost didn’t see Lady Macbeth, my number one film of 2017. I watched it on a whim after an impressively tense trailer, and a positive recommendation from the Empire Podcast. And boy it did not disappoint. The story, adapted by Alice Birch from the 19th century Russian novel, is inspired by Shakespeare’s enigmatic villainess, but reimagined as…

Repost: Film Inquiry’s Favourite 2018 Emmy Series Nominees

We’re hours away from discovering the winners of the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards; you’ve seen our choices for the Acting categories (here and here) – both the drama categories and the comedy/miniseries combo – so now is as good a time as any for us to plant the flags for Programs. Our team of writers could throw…

The Almighty Sometimes: Brave and Heart-Wrenching Tale of Motherly Love

Narratives about fathers and sons have dominated the canon of great plays for centuries. Sophocles, Shakespeare, Miller: these men, and their oft told tales of struggling patriarchs, are still staged internationally today. Male playwrights, directors and actors have for so long taken up all the space in the cultural conversation. Plays are designed to show…

Macbeth: Impressive Cast Delivers Devastating Tragedy With A Twist

The beauty of Shakespeare’s plays lies in their flexibility and creative potential. Written over four hundred years ago, the Bard’s thirty-seven comedies and tragedies have inspired film, theatre, musicals, television and more. It is remarkable to consider the infinite directorial possibilities that these plays hold. This week in Sydney alone, two different theatre companies stage…

Isle of Dogs: Too Much Quirk, Not Enough Substance

Wes Anderson, king of quirk, has long been gathering a liege of dedicated cinephiles who drool over his every film. And, I confess, I am one of his long-time fans. Especially considering the incredibly high expectations set by his previous film, 2014’s multi-Oscar winning The Grand Budapest Hotel. However, if you go into the cinema…

Repost: Staff Inquiry Favourite 2018 Emmy Acting Nominees

As we here at Film Inquiry begin to branch off into the world of television, and with the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards just around the corner (September 17 if you haven’t already penciled it into your diary), it seems like the perfect time for some of the team to assemble to discuss why our favourite…

SHERLOCK GNOMES: Please, Gno-more Sherlock Adaptions

Sherlock Gnomes, directed by John Stevenson, tries too hard but does too little, in a film that’s more concerned with referencing better movies than doing its own thing. This mediocre sequel to the mildly entertaining Gnomeo and Juliet suffers due to tired writing that loses sight of what made the original good. The Story That Didn’t Need A…

Review: Single Asian Female

When Lady Bird aired earlier this year, women all over the world fell in love with it for its painfully accurate representation of mother-daughter relationships. Sitting in the Belvoir St Theatre watching freshly divorced mother Pearl (Hsiao-Ling Tang) struggling to keep it together while running a Chinese restaurant and a family single handed, I was…

REPOST: Film Inquiry’s Top Films Of The Academy

For a year now I have been a proud contributing writer to Film Inquiry, an online film magazine with writers all over the world. This article was compiled by Stephanie Archer, and written by many writers including myself. It was first published in February 2017.  Everyone has their favorite film, a cherished classic that reigns superior…

My Top Ten Films of 2017

Surprise! My review of the best of 2017 managed to only be a whole month late! (Hey, it’s better than 2016’s April release). My problem, admittedly, is once I start writing about the films I love, it’s hard for me to stop. Please enjoy my ‘Best of 2017’ list, and comment below what you think…

PADDINGTON 2: A Warm, Furry Hug Of A Movie

In 2014, Paddington Bear walked off the pages of his cartoon, on to Paddington station and into our cinemas. It soon became an unlikely family favourite. It showcased some of Britain’s best actors – from Hugh Bonneville’s lovingly exasperated patriarch, to Sally Hawkins’ eccentric yet caring mother, and Julie Waters as the comic relief housekeeper. At the film’s soft, furry heart is Paddington, cheerfully…