Review: The Italians at Belvoir 25A

The Italians is a farce that thrives on chaos and silliness. It’s not the most coherent script, but that haphazard quality is what makes it so charming.

The Italians has the energy of a university revue or high school play. It doesn’t always make a lot of sense, but everyone’s having so much fun that you don’t really care.

Review: Looking for Alibrandi at Belvoir

Looking for Alibrandi is a thoughtful depiction of a teenage girl torn between cultural identities, and a moving tale of mothers and daughters. Ultimately, I was disappointed by the director and designer’s use of the Belvoir space. While the production lacked the warmth of the original writing, the funny, loving lead performances of Macri and Mastrantone are a joy to watch, and it is well worth seeing.

Review: Moon Rabbit Rising

I’ve never seen a show quite like Moon Rabbit Rising and struggle to put the experience into words. All I can say is, sitting in the packed Downstairs Belvoir space on the first night of previews, I think the entire audience felt one thing: entranced.

The Boomkak Panto Review: A Joyful Return to the Theatre for Sydneysiders

ettter to small aussie communities, and the art form of theatre itself. A classic entry into the ‘show-within-a-show’ genre, it is full of audience interaction, and self-aware humour about rehearsals, auditions and the chaos of trying to stage a performance despite the world falling apart.

Stop Girl Review: Long-Winded Tale of PTSD

Stop Girl is a provocative reflection of what can happen when we succumb to the pressure to achieve at all costs, regardless of deteriorating health and mental health. In the age of the pandemic, where working from home is forcing the boundaries between our personal and professional lives to be blurred, the central message of Stop Girl—that your mental health is more important than any job—is not one to be neglected.

Belvoir’s Prize Fighter Explosive and Compelling: Theatre Review

Belvoir’s first main stage production, Prize Fighter, is a violent, explosive and utterly watchable work of theatre. The show starts with a bang, as two sweaty actors in a boxing ring begin pummelling each other with their fists in the ring. The fight director, Nigel Poulton, has pulled out all stops to make such fights…