Review: Hubris and Humiliation at STC

Treston’s writing is witty and intelligent, paying homage to Austen while also creating a fun, campy story that stands on its own. Director Dean Bryant has delivered an energetic laugh-out-loud production—Hubris and Humiliation is a joy— a sparkly, fizzy delight.

Review: Australian Theatre Live & Emerald City

Australian Theatre Live has arrived and it’s the perfect compromise if you find yourself unable to go to the theatre for whatever reason (geographic, financial, Covid-19, etc). The new theatrical streaming service takes it inspiration from the success of National Theatre Live in the UK, offering high quality video recordings of mainstage theatrical performances. The…

Review: The Dazzle at Meraki Arts Bar

I left the theatre unsure of what I was supposed to get out of The Dazzle.

Maybe this is a simple matter of personal taste, and maybe I’m just not amenable to Greenberg’s style, but this production didn’t click for me.

I struggle with writing reviews of plays I don’t like, especially when those plays are created by indie companies because I know how hard it is to be an indie artist, and I know how much love is poured into these productions. However, I can’t pretend to be objective as a reviewer, I can only interpret and critique art by drawing on my own experiences and tastes.

Review: The Italians at Belvoir 25A

The Italians is a farce that thrives on chaos and silliness. It’s not the most coherent script, but that haphazard quality is what makes it so charming.

The Italians has the energy of a university revue or high school play. It doesn’t always make a lot of sense, but everyone’s having so much fun that you don’t really care.

Review: The Lifespan of a Fact at STC

The script is not subtle in its moralising about facts versus art, but it is effective. STC’s marketing evoked Aaron Sorkin, which is an apt comparison. Jim is agonisingly pedantic about the facts, and John is a pretentious egotist. Neither of them are fully likeable, and neither are 100% right or wrong— the writers let you decide where you fall. Jim and John’s battle is the clash of pragmatism and high-mindedness, a battle against what is correct, and what is dramatically compelling.

Review: How to Defend Yourself

Padilla’s script is urgent and contemporary, although a little underdeveloped. However, Barrie and her team have taken the writing as it is, and created an impressive, powerful production that demands to be heard.

Review: The One at Ensemble Theatre

The One, by Vanessa Bates, doesn’t know what kind of story it wants to be. Directed by Darren Yap, the latest Australian play at the Ensemble Theatre, struggles with muddled storytelling and tonal dissonance. Marketed as an upbeat family comedy, The One is not as funny as it thinks it is. However, it’s also not…

Review: Albion at the Seymour Centre

Albion is an ambitious production of a formidable text that explores big ideas about humanity, class, family and social change. It’s a thought-provoking work of writing that has stayed with me all week. To successfully stage Bartlett’s intimidating and ideas-heavy text is a tall order, especially for an indie production, and Clements and the team have a real crack at it. An admirable attempt at a difficult text, Bartlett’s writing, combined with Briant’s lead performance and Langford’s thoughtful design makes this an impressive and thought-provoking night out at the theatre.

Review: Ugly Love at Flight Path Theatre

Ugly Love is a witty and topical show and Matthews should be applauded for taking on the considerable challenge of bringing a new Australian musical to our stages. I felt lucky to be a part of the audience and hope to see the work develop and grow in future productions.

Review: Moon Rabbit Rising

I’ve never seen a show quite like Moon Rabbit Rising and struggle to put the experience into words. All I can say is, sitting in the packed Downstairs Belvoir space on the first night of previews, I think the entire audience felt one thing: entranced.

Review: M.ROCK at ATYP

M.Rock is a crowd-pleasing coming-of-age story that proves that it’s never too late to come of age and rediscover yourself. Anchored by two charming performances and supported by a witty and versatile ensemble, it’s a guaranteed good time at the theatre.

Review: Daddy Developed a Pill at KXT

Watching Daddy Develops a Pill felt a bit like experiencing all the emotions of a party in one sitting. At times, the show’s chaotic and fast-paced tone feels like you’ve taken a handful of illicit substances and they’re all hitting you at once. Where are you? What’s going on? You’re not entirely sure. But you think you’re having fun. Other times the high-energy frantic action all feels like too much, and you crave an intermission (or even a brief quiet moment in the party’s bathroom to collect your thoughts).